Category Archives: Alumni News

Stories about NT graduates.

Are You a Whiz with Words?

If you are – and have editing experience – the North Toronto Foundation, the voice of NTCI’s alumni needs your help! We are in need of an alumnus interested in joining the Board’s Communications Team to take on the responsibility of being our editor. Formal training as a copy editor is preferred as responsibilities include ensuring clarity and consistency in all print materials including:

  • letters
  • brochures
  • articles for the Foundation’s  website
  • content for the annual newsletter

The Board meets at NTCI six to eight times during the school year on a Monday or Wednesday evening from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. From time to time, the Communications Team may meet informally before a regularly scheduled meeting. For more information and/or to express your interest in this opportunity, please contact Ron Wakelin, Chair of the North Toronto Foundation: rwakelin@utschools.ca.

 No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.
– H.G. Wells

A good, let alone a great editor is an obsessive autocrat with a will of iron, who rewrites and rewrites, cuts and slashes, until every piece is exactly the way he thinks it should have been done.
Peter Drucker (1909-2005)

We Have Trophies!

As an important part of the school’s legacy, North Toronto C.I. is fortunate to have a large collection of trophies, plaques and awards. Many of these artifacts, recognizing the varied achievements of NT students, are found in the school’s Archives Room. In a recent visit to NT, Nancy Baines, the Foundation’s archivist and a member of NT’s staff from 1969 to 2000, identified some of the significant trophies in the collection:

  • Ostrander Trophy for Proficiency and Leadership in Athletics (girls) – awarded from 1939 to 75;
  • J.M. Greene Music Company Trophy for Citizenship, Scholarship and Music –awarded from 1947 to 1978;
  • The Sifton Trophy for School Citizenship – awarded from 1939 to the present;
  • The Kerr Trophy for Student Leadership – awarded from 1928 to the present 2018 (awarded for 90 years!).

She also pointed out some of the lesser known trophies in the collection:

  • Hill, Ford and Kaethler Trophy for Leadership and Co-operation in Grade 11 and 12 Music – awarded circa 1967
  • The North Toronto Trophy for Junior Oratory  – awarded from 1957 to 1962.
  • NTCI Juvenile Sports Champion Trophy – awarded from 1957 to 1978;
  • The Seaforth Cup Interscholastic Sports Competition – awarded in 1958;
  • TS Harbord Invitational Jr. Basketball Tournament – awarded from1960 to 1996.

There are many fascinating stories behind these awards and of the students who were honoured to receive them. Throughout this year watch for articles featuring a closer look at NT’s trophies and their recipients.

North Toronto CI Commemorates Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day, originally known as Armistice Day,  commemorates the end of the First World War on November 11, 1918. While the original reason for the event took place 100 years ago, its observance has taken on new meaning with each armed conflict involving Canadian soldiers – most recently Afghanistan. While most alumni will recall an assembly or other observation of this special day during their years at NT, in recent years Remembrance Day has become even more profound for NT students.

This year’s assembly on Friday, November 9 was held twice in order to accommodate the school’s population. It began with a song video, Pittance of Time, featuring the ghosts of former soldiers visible only to those willing to partake in a moment of silence in the modern setting of a convenience store. The emotional pull of this piece set the atmosphere for the rest of the event. A bagpiper led a procession of NT veterans into the auditorium. Spanning several generations and representing different conflicts, each veteran was introduced by a student volunteer. A slide show followed featuring photographs of NT grads who lost their lives in World Wars I and II. The young faces in the images looked like many of the students in the auditorium.

Addresses were given by two NT grads currently in active service: Captain John Stevens (’83) and Lieutenant Colonel Michael Clarry (’82). A second slide show outlined Canada’s involvement in peacekeeping missions around the world. Music was provided by the Symphonic Band, and Choir. To draw the assembly to a close, there was a reading of “In Flanders Fields,” the playing of The Last Post, a minute of silence, and Reveille.

This outline does not do justice to the organization behind the event nor to its impact. After the assembly, a reception, supported by monies from the Foundation, was held for the special guests, staff and organizers. During this, it became clear how much the assembly reflected the students who produced it, and how deeply they were invested in its meaning. We need not worry that today’s students “don’t get it”. They do – and at NT they created a powerful reflection of this important day.

NTCI’s Second Annual Homecoming: October 11-13, 2018

All NT Alumni are invited to attend to this year’s Annual Homecoming. Be sure to mark your calendars and check out the schedule of events.

Thursday, October 11th: NTCI’s Red and Grey Day followed by Pub Night

  • 1:00–4:00 pm
    • attend Red and Grey Day’s afternoon sporting events
    • light refreshments served in the second floor Staff Room—a great vantage point to watch the Senior Boys’ football game on the field and peruse archival items on display
  • 5:00 pm onwards
    • following the football game, head to the Granite Brewery, 245 Eglinton Ave. East at Mount Pleasant for a Pub Night. You don’t have to have been athlete attend!!

Friday, October 12th: Show and Share, School Tours and Class Pub Nights

  • 1:00–3:00 pm
    • join us in the second floor Staff Room; bring your NT mementos and NT archivist Nancy Baines will show you ours as she shares some of the amazing treasures found in the NT archives!
  • 3:15 pm
    • NT Buddies lead tours around the “new” school; tours leave from the second floor Staff Room.
  • Evening
    • this is an opportunity to organize a get together for your year!
    • years with significant anniversaries in 2018 are especially encouraged to plan something; i.e. 1948, 1963, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1993, 1998, 2003
    • 1968, 2008 and 2013 have already had reunions this spring/summer!
    • check the list of Class Reps to see if anything is planned for your year; if not, start something!
    • Planning an event? Let us know and we’ll post it here!
  • List of Get Togethers To Date:
    • Girls of the 50s Luncheon – Thursday October11th: Cucina di Paisano, 865 York Mills Rd; contact: Joan (Morrison) Grosse at mgrs.@sympatico.ca or Carol Kaltenbock at 416-755-3915 by October 4th
    • Class of ‘82 55th Birthday Party – Friday October 12th, 7:00-10:00 pm: Prohibition Gastrohouse, 696 Queen St East; contact: lisa-ian@rogers.com
    • Class of ’88 30th Anniversary Party Saturday October 13th, 8:00 pm: 487 Oriole Pkwy contact Hilary Newman at hilarynewman@sympatico.ca

Saturday, October 13th: NTCI’s All Years Mix & Mingle 7:00-10:00pm

  • NOTE: venue changed from NTCI to Prohibition Gastrohouse, Midtown 40 Eglinton Ave. East
    • to reserve your spot for the “mix and mingle”:
    • call 416-406-2669 ext. 2 by October 6th; be sure to mention you are with the NTCI group.
  • OR
    • reserve online at www.myprohibition.com; be sure to reserve the Midtown location and note you are with the NTCI group in the comments.

The Class of 2013’s Five Year Reunion

The Class of 2013 is delighted to announce that their Five Year Reunion, held this past August, was a successful and enjoyable event! With 65 tickets sold, the venue proved to be a great choice. The organizers were able to decorate the room with helium-filled balloons, control their own music and project a “remember when” slideshow on a wall. In keeping with their nostalgic NT theme, food included an Uber food delivery of 200 chicken nuggets and 50 small fries from McDonald’s! This was an interesting accompaniment to the event’s signature drink of vodka-cranberry – aptly named “The Roehampton”.

All those who attended enjoyed the opportunity to reconnect and catch-up. Although they don’t know what lies ahead, rumor has it they are already looking forward to their Ten Year Reunion in 2023! The North Toronto Foundation is also very grateful to the organizers for their very generous donation of $475, the proceeds from the event.

Class of 2013 Reunion!

What’s up, NT! 

Five years is a really long time and well, the truth is, we miss you! So we were thinking a reunion is in order. Let’s celebrate the fun (and super cringey) memories we made all those years ago.

All ’13 NT alumni and plus ones are welcome.

Tickets on sale now ($35-45) include the price of admission and two drink tickets.

Prices will go up, so make sure you get your ticket(s) soon!

Date: Saturday August 25th, 2018
Time: 7:00 PM – 1:00 AM
Location: 360 Geary Avenue
To Register: https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/ntci-class-of-13-reunion-5-years-later-tickets-45326306202

You’re welcome to contact Marcus Gottlieb, Rachel LooJill SmithRobert ZhangMegan AbbeySabina WexShane WrightNoam Hacker or email us at northtoronto13@gmail.com with any questions!

REIGNITE! An NT Athletics Fundraiser

Photos of the event can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.3606879832718391.1073742671.144748248931584&type=1&l=c3d747613c

  • May 17, 2018
  • 7:00 pm to 11:45 pm
  • Safari Bar & Grille (1749 Avenue Rd, Toronto)

Greetings Fellow NT Athletic Alumni!

A group of dedicated NT Alumni from the 70s, 80s and 90s, have been working with current and retired NT Staff to create the new “North Toronto Collegiate Athletic Parents Council” (referred to in an earlier article as “The North Toronto Athletics Committee”).

Committed to raising an awareness of NT’s athletic legacy and furthering the school’s winning traditions, the new council aims to “Connect the Past with the Present and Build Towards the Future” by providing financial support for equipment, uniforms, AV equipment, sports science and more. Why let the Music Department have all the Fun.

NTCI has an incredibly rich Sports History thanks in no small part to your contributions.

To Celebrate the Inaugural Friend-Raising Event we have invited Dr. Ron Taylor – affectionately referred to as “Dr. Baseball” to join us along with several other Notable NT Athletes as well as significant members of the Retired Coaching Staff will be in attendance.

Please grab a few old NT Friends and plan to attend this exciting event.

For more information and tickets: https://northtoronto.snapd.com/events/view/1138475

Elvino’s Trumpets

Regular readers of the Foundation news will recognize the name, Elvino Sauro (’52)—NT’s benefactor extraordinaire! His financial contributions include the Heritage, support for the “Memories Forever” concert (part of the 100th anniversary celebrations in 2012) and an endowment leading to the establishment of the Elvino Sauro Music Award, ensuring that deserving students in need continue to experience private lessons and other enhancements to their music education.

Elvino’s original trumpet, purchased in the 1940s and willed to NT

Although Elvino passed away on September 8, 2017, his spirit of giving back continues. A star trumpeter in his days at NT, he purchased his own instrument and took lessons, thanks to a loan from the school. Although he paid the loan back long before graduating, he made sure that the instrument “came home,” as he bequeathed this trumpet to NTCI’s Music Department in his will. The instrument, a good quality student model, is well travelled—note two faded travel stickers, one from Cunard Lines! There is even music inside the case that looks like marching band music! However, Elvino’s legacy doesn’t end here!

Nicolette and Dong performing on the trumpets donated to NT from Elvino’s estate

When NT’s 100th anniversary approached, Elvino decided he wanted to play again. So, at the age of 79, he bought two professional level trumpets, began practicing and performed in the band and orchestra at Roy Thomson Hall. In the spirit of Elvino’s generosity, his estate representatives donated these instruments to NTCI. Thanks to Elvino, students have the opportunity to play professional level instruments, not the kind usually found in a high school music room!

Elvino’s life was strongly shaped by his years at North Toronto CI and he has left a wonderful legacy that continues to inspire. Bravo, Elvino!

Remembering Gerald Dunlevie

Mr. Dunlevie was a gentleman through and through. He was always dressed in a dapper suit, often with a bow tie, and I imagine he looked very much the same as he did as a first-year teacher when my mother was at Oakwood Collegiate in his very first Grade 13 Latin class. Mr. Dunlevie wrote about their relationship in a letter to her on her 70th birthday, back in 2006:

My first association with Estelle, half a century ago in 1953–1954, was a curious kind of role reversal, played out in my first Grade 13 Latin class at Oakwood Collegiate Institute in Toronto.

I was a callow first-year teacher, while Estelle was a mature seventeen-year-old whose calming and steadying presence in the class helped me through the year. My students’ whole high school careers would be made or broken by their performance in the externally set and marked Departmental Examination, so it was unheard of for a neophyte to be entrusted with the responsibility of preparing them for it. The experience was a steep learning curve for a teacher and students, but Estelle’s support and encouragement played no small part in our success; they all passed, and Estelle got the mark in the 80s that she had so richly earned.

This letter is characteristic of Mr. Dunlevie’s humility and appreciation of his students. It was no doubt his hard work, and not my mother’s, that led to the success of every single one of his Grade 13 students that year.

Years later, when I entered Grade 9 at NTCI in the fall of 1983, I had no doubt that Mr. Dunlevie knew exactly who I was. He always had a smile for me, and a wise quotation to share. I always enjoyed talking with Mr. Dunlevie, as he was a font of knowledge and supremely respectful of his students—he talked to us as if we were all very important indeed. In Grade 11, I was lucky enough to go on a trip to Greece and Rome with Mr. Dunlevie and other members of the Classics Department. I remember sitting at a little restaurant in Athens as Mr. Dunlevie and Mr. Maitman took turns pouring retzina and ouzo into my glass. After all, Mr. Dunlevie did like a good glass of wine—and I was not much of a drinker. I believe he felt that part of my classics education should involve an appreciation of the Bacchic delights such as wine and other alcoholic pleasures.

In my final year of high school, I had the great honour of being Mr. Dunlevie’s final student. Once a week at lunch, I would go to Mr. Dunlevie’s office, and he would teach me ancient Greek. He clearly instilled a love of the subject in me, as I returned to it in university, where I completed a major in ancient Greek studies. Such was his impact on so many of his students.

Mr. Dunlevie and I “graduated” from NTCI in the same year—1988. Mr. Dunlevie retired, and I finished Grade 13. Both of us went on to study at the University of Toronto; I completed an Honours B.A., while Mr. Dunlevie engaged in a PhD in modern Italian. Once in a while, we would bump into each other on campus, and he would invariably invite me to join him for a refreshment at Hart House, where we would catch each other up on our lives and our studies. Mr. Dunlevie continued to include me and my mother in his life, inviting us to attend his graduation celebration and, most recently, his 88th birthday party, which we were both honoured to attend. 

In the above letter to my mother, Mr. Dunlevie, in characteristic Mr. Dunlevie fashion, quoted Louis Hémon’s heroine, Maria Chapdelaine, as saying she “knows the essential hierarchy of things that count.” We could just as easily say the same of Mr. Dunlevie. He was a man who valued the pursuit of knowledge, strong relationships, love, good food, fine drink, and music. The light he brought to the world will be sorely missed.

— Nancy Steinhauer (’88)