Are You a Whiz with Words?

If you are – and have editing experience – the North Toronto Foundation, the voice of NTCI’s alumni needs your help! We are in need of an alumnus interested in joining the Board’s Communications Team to take on the responsibility of being our editor. Formal training as a copy editor is preferred as responsibilities include ensuring clarity and consistency in all print materials including:

  • letters
  • brochures
  • articles for the Foundation’s  website
  • content for the annual newsletter

The Board meets at NTCI six to eight times during the school year on a Monday or Wednesday evening from 7:00 to 9:00 pm. From time to time, the Communications Team may meet informally before a regularly scheduled meeting. For more information and/or to express your interest in this opportunity, please contact Ron Wakelin, Chair of the North Toronto Foundation: rwakelin@utschools.ca.

 No passion in the world is equal to the passion to alter someone else’s draft.
– H.G. Wells

A good, let alone a great editor is an obsessive autocrat with a will of iron, who rewrites and rewrites, cuts and slashes, until every piece is exactly the way he thinks it should have been done.
Peter Drucker (1909-2005)

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The Ostrander Trophy

This impressive trophy was awarded to young women for Proficiency and Leadership in Athletics. First presented in 1939, it was last awarded in 1975.

The origin of the trophy is a bit of a mystery. The inscription reads that it was presented to N.T.C.I. for Proficiency and Leadership in Athletics. It might have been donated by the Ostrander family, owners of Ostrander’s Jewellery, a well-known Ontario chain. Although the main Toronto store was on Queen Street near Yonge, their North Toronto location was on the east side of Yonge at Castlefield, so it could well be that there was a strong connection between the Ostrander family and North Toronto CI. *

A look at the trophy reveals the names of all the accomplished young women who had the honour of receiving it. Two winners from different times, Nina Lancaster (1947) and Mary Ellis (1974) were randomly selected for a closer look. According to the 1947 yearbook, “Nina – always bubbling over with enthusiasm for sports… Dancing eyes and a merry laugh are the first impressions of Nina – Headed for Honor [sic] Science at U. of T.” While additional information about Nina was not found, such was not the case for Mary Ellis. Her intriguing yearbook entry includes: “adidas, football shoulders, moon boots, ice cream parties, Vermont, Frans, Hubert!” and ends with “Queens”. Her school records indicated that she moved to Whistler after graduating from NTCI. Sadly, further research revealed that Mary Elizabeth, known to her friends as “Mary-Liz” passed away on December 4, 2009. Her obituary highlighted that she lived in Banff during the 80s, attended the University of Calgary, was a member of the U of C rowing team and after receiving her B. Sc., pursued a career as a pharmaceutical representative for Novo Nordisk. Her obituary also mentions the fact that she was the NTCI Female Athlete of the Year when she was in Grade 13 so it is clear that receiving the award meant a great deal to her.
* If you are able to contribute information regarding the Ostrander Trophy’s origins, please contact Ron Wakelin, Chair of the North Toronto Foundation: rwakelin@utschools.ca

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We Have Trophies!

As an important part of the school’s legacy, North Toronto C.I. is fortunate to have a large collection of trophies, plaques and awards. Many of these artifacts, recognizing the varied achievements of NT students, are found in the school’s Archives Room. In a recent visit to NT, Nancy Baines, the Foundation’s archivist and a member of NT’s staff from 1969 to 2000, identified some of the significant trophies in the collection:

  • Ostrander Trophy for Proficiency and Leadership in Athletics (girls) – awarded from 1939 to 75;
  • J.M. Greene Music Company Trophy for Citizenship, Scholarship and Music –awarded from 1947 to 1978;
  • The Sifton Trophy for School Citizenship – awarded from 1939 to the present;
  • The Kerr Trophy for Student Leadership – awarded from 1928 to the present 2018 (awarded for 90 years!).

She also pointed out some of the lesser known trophies in the collection:

  • Hill, Ford and Kaethler Trophy for Leadership and Co-operation in Grade 11 and 12 Music – awarded circa 1967
  • The North Toronto Trophy for Junior Oratory  – awarded from 1957 to 1962.
  • NTCI Juvenile Sports Champion Trophy – awarded from 1957 to 1978;
  • The Seaforth Cup Interscholastic Sports Competition – awarded in 1958;
  • TS Harbord Invitational Jr. Basketball Tournament – awarded from1960 to 1996.

There are many fascinating stories behind these awards and of the students who were honoured to receive them. Throughout this year watch for articles featuring a closer look at NT’s trophies and their recipients.

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Robert (Bob) LeRoy (’61) (1943-2018)

Robert James LeRoy, one of Canada’s foremost theoretical chemists and a North Toronto grad, passed away August 10, 2018, at the age of 74.

The second of four brothers, all of whom attended NTCI between 1955 and 1967, Bob was a keen and talented student. His brother John (’67) recalled:

“I remember in his final year of high school… he wrote exams in three different types of math. In two of them he received a perfect mark of 100%, while in the other he received a little less. He knew where he had made a careless error and he lamented about it for weeks after. He knew he should have been perfect in all three.”

After graduating from NT, Bob attended the University of Toronto, earning his B.Sc. in Math and Chemistry in 1965 and his M.Sc in Chemistry in 1967. He left Canada to pursue doctoral work in Chemistry at the University of Wisconsin- Madison, where he received his Ph.D. in 1971. He returned to U of T for a year of post-doctoral work before becoming an Associate Professor at the University of Waterloo. He spent the rest of his academic career at the U of W and at the time of his passing was a Professor of Chemistry and Associate Dean of Science for Computing.

His work focused on the behaviour of molecules and atoms, particularly the forces occurring among them. He became a giant in this highly specialized field, starting with his doctoral work focusing on non-covalent bonds. When asked to explain the complexities of his profession to laypeople he was known to say: “I study the sex life of molecules.”

Brilliant and energetic, Bob possessed an endless enthusiasm for new experiences and ideas. He inspired and mentored thousands of young scientists. One page of the chemistry textbook currently in use in Ontario high schools is devoted to the LeRoy radius, a technique for mathematically defining the radius of a small molecule, which is key to understanding the forces at work both inside and outside of that boundary. John Polanyi, winner of the 1986 Nobel Prize in chemistry, remembers: “Robert, whom I came to know as a student and later as a fellow scientist, exhibited indomitable courage and infectious joy in his creative life.” His page on the University of Waterloo website lists 114 research publications in addition to nine scholarships and awards. (http://leroy.uwaterloo.ca/cv.html).

It is interesting to note that Bob was not the only one in his family to follow a career in science. His father, D.J. LeRoy, was a research scientist at the National Research Council, and later the head of Chemistry at the University of Toronto (where he hired John Polanyi). His older brother Rod, ’60, pursued doctoral and post-doctoral work in supersonic molecular beams, and later became the CEO of one of the Noranda companies. Niece Jennifer is currently a post-doctoral fellow at Oxford, working on materials development in single molecule power generation. Quite the family business!
To view Bob’s full obituary in the Globe & Mail, point your browser to: https://www.theglobeandmail.com/canada/article-chemist-robert-j-leroy-studied-the-sexlife-of-molecules/

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Scholarship Winners: Commencement 2018

Betty Bealey Laureateship in English ($300.00): Anastasia Zaritovskaya 

Gibbons Award in French ($500.00): Mahshad Jalali Farahani

Hal Brown “Triple A” Award ($300.00): Marco Pannozzo

Kerr Trophy for Young Women ($500.00): Eloise Cockett

NTCI Foundation Centennial Scholarship ($500.00): Eric Yuyitung

R.R.H. “Bud” Page Valedictory Prize ($300.00): Eloise Cockett

Senator Keith Davey Award ($625.00): Emily Sakaguchi

Sifton Trophy for Young Men ($500.00): Max Zimmerman 

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North Toronto CI Commemorates Remembrance Day

Remembrance Day, originally known as Armistice Day,  commemorates the end of the First World War on November 11, 1918. While the original reason for the event took place 100 years ago, its observance has taken on new meaning with each armed conflict involving Canadian soldiers – most recently Afghanistan. While most alumni will recall an assembly or other observation of this special day during their years at NT, in recent years Remembrance Day has become even more profound for NT students.

This year’s assembly on Friday, November 9 was held twice in order to accommodate the school’s population. It began with a song video, Pittance of Time, featuring the ghosts of former soldiers visible only to those willing to partake in a moment of silence in the modern setting of a convenience store. The emotional pull of this piece set the atmosphere for the rest of the event. A bagpiper led a procession of NT veterans into the auditorium. Spanning several generations and representing different conflicts, each veteran was introduced by a student volunteer. A slide show followed featuring photographs of NT grads who lost their lives in World Wars I and II. The young faces in the images looked like many of the students in the auditorium.

Addresses were given by two NT grads currently in active service: Captain John Stevens (’83) and Lieutenant Colonel Michael Clarry (’82). A second slide show outlined Canada’s involvement in peacekeeping missions around the world. Music was provided by the Symphonic Band, and Choir. To draw the assembly to a close, there was a reading of “In Flanders Fields,” the playing of The Last Post, a minute of silence, and Reveille.

This outline does not do justice to the organization behind the event nor to its impact. After the assembly, a reception, supported by monies from the Foundation, was held for the special guests, staff and organizers. During this, it became clear how much the assembly reflected the students who produced it, and how deeply they were invested in its meaning. We need not worry that today’s students “don’t get it”. They do – and at NT they created a powerful reflection of this important day.

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NTCI’s Second Annual Homecoming: October 11-13, 2018

All NT Alumni are invited to attend to this year’s Annual Homecoming. Be sure to mark your calendars and check out the schedule of events.

Thursday, October 11th: NTCI’s Red and Grey Day followed by Pub Night

  • 1:00–4:00 pm
    • attend Red and Grey Day’s afternoon sporting events
    • light refreshments served in the second floor Staff Room—a great vantage point to watch the Senior Boys’ football game on the field and peruse archival items on display
  • 5:00 pm onwards
    • following the football game, head to the Granite Brewery, 245 Eglinton Ave. East at Mount Pleasant for a Pub Night. You don’t have to have been athlete attend!!

Friday, October 12th: Show and Share, School Tours and Class Pub Nights

  • 1:00–3:00 pm
    • join us in the second floor Staff Room; bring your NT mementos and NT archivist Nancy Baines will show you ours as she shares some of the amazing treasures found in the NT archives!
  • 3:15 pm
    • NT Buddies lead tours around the “new” school; tours leave from the second floor Staff Room.
  • Evening
    • this is an opportunity to organize a get together for your year!
    • years with significant anniversaries in 2018 are especially encouraged to plan something; i.e. 1948, 1963, 1973, 1978, 1983, 1993, 1998, 2003
    • 1968, 2008 and 2013 have already had reunions this spring/summer!
    • check the list of Class Reps to see if anything is planned for your year; if not, start something!
    • Planning an event? Let us know and we’ll post it here!
  • List of Get Togethers To Date:
    • Girls of the 50s Luncheon – Thursday October11th: Cucina di Paisano, 865 York Mills Rd; contact: Joan (Morrison) Grosse at mgrs.@sympatico.ca or Carol Kaltenbock at 416-755-3915 by October 4th
    • Class of ‘82 55th Birthday Party – Friday October 12th, 7:00-10:00 pm: Prohibition Gastrohouse, 696 Queen St East; contact: lisa-ian@rogers.com
    • Class of ’88 30th Anniversary Party Saturday October 13th, 8:00 pm: 487 Oriole Pkwy contact Hilary Newman at hilarynewman@sympatico.ca

Saturday, October 13th: NTCI’s All Years Mix & Mingle 7:00-10:00pm

  • NOTE: venue changed from NTCI to Prohibition Gastrohouse, Midtown 40 Eglinton Ave. East
    • to reserve your spot for the “mix and mingle”:
    • call 416-406-2669 ext. 2 by October 6th; be sure to mention you are with the NTCI group.
  • OR
    • reserve online at www.myprohibition.com; be sure to reserve the Midtown location and note you are with the NTCI group in the comments.
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Richard Van Praagh (’47)

This past summer, Ron Wakelin, Co-chair of the North Toronto Foundation, received a delightful letter from Dr. Richard Van Praagh (’47), Harvard Professor Emeritus, Harvard Medical School that was written on letterhead from Boston Children’s Hospital. The following excerpts are from Dr. Van Praagh’s correspondence.

I graduated from NTCI in 1947 (I’m 88 now). I was fortunate enough to be accepted into the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. I graduated in 1954 with an MD degree. Then followed 10 years of postgraduate work. I fell in love with pediatrics and then with pediatric cardiology…

After 10 years of postgraduate work, [in October 1965] I was invited to join the staff of Boston Children’s Hospital where I have worked ever since as a pediatric cardiologist, pathologist and embryologist. I have written more than 310 scientific papers, published a video series, edited a book on congenital-heart disease and have just finished writing a medical book, The Diagnostic and Surgical Pathology of Congenital Heart Disease. I have also written a book for the general, non-medical reader, Survival: A New Approach from the Life Sciences to the Major Problem of Our Time

Returning to NTCI, I owe an enormous debt of gratitude to NTCI for the excellence of its teaching. I remember Betty Bealey (English), Hal Brown (Athletics), Bob Gladish (Athletics) and “Bud” Page (Latin). A great crew; a wonderful beginning…

NTCI was an important part of my foundation… This is one graduate’s THANK YOU to NTCI.

 

We found this YouTube interview:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNp2vwgLDGk

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Charles Albert “Bud” Hill, NT Staff (‘62-’69) (1929-2018)

Bud’s obituary was simple – “Charles “Bud” Hill was born on July 12, 1929 and passed away on May 3, 2018”. No doubt somewhere along the line, Bud had told his family that he wanted nothing fussy, “just the facts, man”. However, in between the day he came into the world and the day he left, there was a whole lot of living! As a musician and educator, Bud touched hundreds of lives and inspired more young people than any of us will ever know. Although he was on staff at NTCI for just seven years during the 60s, his impact on the music program was enormous. Never short on opinions, those of us who were in his class can never forget his rants about the proper way to play a dotted eight and sixteenth, the virtues of an Alford March (as opposed to a “never-to-be-played” Sousa March), the necessity of attending TSO Student Concerts in order to pass and, of course, this reminder to any brass player, “don’t play like a girl” and to just “pick up the horn and WAIL, man!”

Even NTCI music room’s organizational system was a Bud original – his duct tape labelling system for school instruments was yellow for grade 9 instruments, gray for grade 10 and white for senior instruments. A novel system but clearly developed by Bud as it was dictated by his colour blindness. There was good reason why he drove a yellow car and most of his ties were yellow as white, black, gray and yellow were the only colours he could see.

However, there was much more to Bud! Behind the passionate and charismatic educator, there was a superbly talented composer and arranger. His iconic march written for NTCI, 17 Broadway, was praised in Kiwanis competitions, as was his captivating Chant and Dance for Solo Piano and Concert Band. As an arranger, he had an uncanny ability to score perfectly for his performers and in doing so, delighted his audiences. There was nothing as carefully and caringly written as Bud’s Maytime Melodies medleys. His arrangement of Oh Canada is still the standard at NT and for many years was used to open the annual concert of the Toronto Board of Education Secondary School Music Teachers’ Association. In later years, when playing tuba with The Band of the Royal Regiment of Canada, Bud also composed the delightful Brutish Tubadiers featuring a tuba trio!

Bud’s contribution to music education is best measured by the tributes to him. As one his former students wrote, “inside the tiger was the most gentle and caring soul” – a truly insightful description of an unforgettable teacher who was passionate, inspirational, dedicated, and fiercely patriotic.

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